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Portrait of the Youngest Girl

Artist

Name: Jude Rush
Statement: Sacred Geometry defined by Wikipedia: "Sacred geometry is used as a religious, philosophical, and spiritual term to explain the fundamental laws of the universe covering pythagorean geometry and the perceived relationships between geometrical laws and quantum mechanical laws of the universe that create the geometrical patterns in nature." I think that is pretty much the way I feel about the series. I believe that many of the master painters used sacred geometry to generate compositions and compositional relationships. I started using the series as a way to generate compositions that made sense to me. The specific way I adapt the series: Using the face of my adult children, I cover every line on their face with which ever part of the spiral fits that line. (I will refer to the shape Golden Spiral.) I use the information of the lines to generate a simpler composition. I am interested in how the composition reflects the relationship between me and my subject but also how the composition moves the eye around the page. The golden spiral is a a geometrical pattern generated from a mathematical sequence called the fibonacci series. When you add the previous number to the current number you get the next number: Here is the beginning of the series to demonstrate. 1+1=2, so the first 3 numbers in the series is 1,1,2. The next number will be 1+2=3 resulting in1,1,2,3. Here is the series a bit longer: 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,144É It is the golden spiral shape I use to map subject. The only rule is I must maintain the RELATIONSHIP of the the shape. It is after all, the relationship to each other that creates the balance. If I change the relationship, I change the balance. I began making the series depicting my children when my youngest daughter went off to college. She was having a particularly difficult time adjusting. I needed a method to meditate on the issue while supporting her choices. Not an easy thing to do for a parent when you see a child making difficult choices (she has since grown into a beautiful, independent young woman.) Portrait of the youngest Girl 1 is the first in a series of work exploring the abilities of the fibonacci series in creating cohesive compositions. Portrait of the Youngest Girl 1 has juried into several art shows. This work received recognition in the form of the QSDS Award of Merite Award during Quilt National 2011. Quilt National is a highly competitive international art quilt show that travels the globe for 2 years. Portrait of the Youngest Girl 1 traveled to France as the QN '11 art quilt representative.

Description:

The Franklin County Convention Facilities Authority today owns the largest contemporary collection of local art in central Ohio. All of the pieces are on display in the Greater Columbus Convention Center, the Hilton Columbus Downtown and the three Convention Center parking garages. The collection is the result of a communitywide... Read more

The Franklin County Convention Facilities Authority today owns the largest contemporary collection of local art in central Ohio. All of the pieces are on display in the Greater Columbus Convention Center, the Hilton Columbus Downtown and the three Convention Center parking garages. The collection is the result of a communitywide call for art, overseen by a committee of community members and implemented by collection curators James and Michael Reese of Reese Brothers Productions. The artists represent the diversity of the Columbus community, cutting across age, gender and race.

Dates

Made: 2015
Installed: 2016

Additional Notes

South Garage - North P1

Media
Info about this place
Indoors
Categories
Indoor Collection
Address:

400 N. High St.
Columbus, Ohio 43215
Franklin County
Venue Website

Materials

Fiber

Dimensions

Width: 25"
Height: 39"

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